Category Archives: Emily Meadows

Emily Meadows is an alumni of international schools and has worked as a professional educator and counselor across the world, serving children and families in the United States, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. She holds master’s degrees in the fields of Counseling and Sexual Health, and is a current Doctor of Philosophy student in Comparative and International Education, researching LGBTQ+ inclusive policy and practice.

Transgender School Policy: What’s Yours?

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets Unless you are a novice educator, you have taught transgender students. You may not have realized it at the time, but I assure you that you have. Increasingly, educators are becoming aware that they have transgender … Continue reading

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5 Concrete Ways to Address #metoo and #timesup in International Schools

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets Everybody’s talking about it. #metoo and #timesup are trending hashtags and campaigns that represent an age-old issue: sexual harassment. This is a global phenomenon, and certainly – unfortunately– present in international schools. Whether you’re inspired by … Continue reading

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Science as a Political Statement

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets I had the honour of meeting with a group of scientists from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) this summer, and I can tell you that it’s no secret within the organization that … Continue reading

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The Invisible Knapsack of Privilege Part II: Heterosexual & Cisgender Privilege

  Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets Almost three decades ago, Peggy McIntosh published her now-legendary piece on White Privilege[1]. McIntosh likened white privilege to an invisible knapsack of advantages that white people carry with them, listing a selection from the abundance … Continue reading

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The Invisible Knapsack of Privilege Part I: Ethnic Privilege

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets Almost three decades ago, Peggy McIntosh published her now-legendary piece on White Privilege[1]. McIntosh likened white privilege to an invisible knapsack of advantages that white people carry with them, revealing a selection of everyday rights withheld … Continue reading

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We Are All Diplomats: The Politics of Being an Expat

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets Growing up American in the Soviet Union, I was highly aware of my nationality. When we moved to Moscow, I was only six years old, and not quite sure what being American meant – but I … Continue reading

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Alternative Facts: Is Your Practice Really Data-Based?

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets So, I’ll start this piece with ‘so’, in a light-hearted tribute to Daniel Kerr’s signature blog-commencing line, and in honour of his 200th post for The International Educator.  Student Preparedness It is expected that educators train … Continue reading

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Intersex Students

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets “Alright, boys and girls!” It’s a common enough call by international educators to their charges. But it makes me cringe. This cry crystalizes a gender binary, implying that there are two categories that all children must … Continue reading

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Transgender Children Deserve a Warm Welcome Back: Here’s How (and why this benefits all students)

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets The roster says they’re a she, but… they look like a he. What do I call them? I’ve met numerous educators who express annoyance at not getting a heads-up from administrators that they have a transgender … Continue reading

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You’re So Lucky to Have Summers Off

Follow Me on Twitter @msmeadowstweets No educator I know actually takes a full summer off. Many, justifiably, use part of the break to recover from a demanding school year, but most of us continue to hone our craft from June to … Continue reading

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