Racism alive in 2020- As school leaders what are the lessons we are teaching our international school communities?

As the sun goes down in beautiful Surrey tonight, tensions are high in my multi cultural household of 3 people. A caucasiian husband, african black mother and a biracial child who identifies strongly with both cultures, and is comfortable with who she is. We are all processing the events of the past week from our individual perspectives as well as the family collective ones. Some conversations have been safe and exploratory whilst others have been heated and unforgiving. Our daughter is an activist on social media with very strong opinions on social injustice and is feeling that it is a wee bit too late for big corporations to be making statements of support, she is asking what exactly they are doing about it besides making a public statement for positive publicity. How will their actions actually make a difference to how black people continue to be treated in this world?

As an active and vocal international educator who has for years tried to make other international educators understand and be conscious of the discrimination people of colour contnue to experience in recruitment practices from recruiters, school boards of directors and school leaders; with one breadth, I am grateful that the conversation has been forced upon us by the recent events in Minneapolis , and I am saddened that in 2020, little has changed in this space. Racism is alive and bubbling and it continues to be systematic. I am grateful that those that have been silent all these years can no longer continue in their ignorance and discomfort and that they are being forced to delve deeply into their consciousness and reflect on what they can do to change practices, understandings and perceptions of white privilege and how they can support others.

Our role as international educators has never been more important as it is today. We have a moral duty to all our students to model leadership as activists and also build community, love, empathy, respect, understanding and all soft skills that will open the door for better communication and collaboration access for all cultures, races and peoples.

What is sad? I have not seen any statement from international schools or recruiters, making a stand against racism especially as many of our students globally are affected by what has happened in recent days.

Passport – race – accent – inequality- culture -black lives matter – people of colour – international mindedness – diversity – white privilege – implicit biases.

WHAT ARE THE DISCUSSIONS WE ARE HAVING ABOUT REAL LIFE ISSUES?

About Proserpina Dhlamini-Fisher

Proserpina Dhlamini-Fisher is the Founding CEO of Educational Aspirations Ltd, a Global Educational Consultancy. She has studied and worked in international schools and organisations (IBO and UWCI) in Eswatini, USA, France, South Africa, Switzerland, Germany, Dubai and the UK in diverse roles. She is passionate about cultural diversity, teaching and learning, inclusion as well as leadership in international education. She is an advocate for student and teacher agency and shares her thoughts and her experiences as an African female school leader and educator in the international and global educational space. She is interested in the historical development of international education and the place people of colour hold in these institutions in the 21st century.
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