The Happiness Advantage

So I managed to read a number of truly inspiring and thought provoking books over the summer, which I will talk about in future posts, but none of them resonated with me as much as The Happiness Advantage, by Shawn Achor. I had read it before, about 7 or 8 years ago after watching his popular TED Talk, but reading it again this time around felt a little different.

 
You see, I have been thinking a lot about the field of positive psychology lately and how it relates to education and student learning, and his research around the 7 principles of lasting positive change helped shape and focus my approach to this school year. I’ve always been a firm believer that the foundation of any great school begins with the culture and relationships that are present in the building, and if you can get the culture and relationships right then the really important work of schools can begin. So, with that firmly in mind, and with two years of culture and collaboration work behind us as a faculty, we have started the year with a focus on the importance and power of things like gratitude and optimism and happiness, and how we can begin cultivating these mindsets with our kids…and with each other.

 
To go hand in hand with this, we have also intensified our focus on the social curriculum, and ramped up our commitment to giving weight to the social and emotional learning of our students each and every day. We’ve made a commitment as a team to hold on to the people around us…each other…and to individually “being the weather” so to speak when approaching all our conversations and interactions with adults and students. We’ve committed to presuming positive intent, finding the educational courage to have the conversations that we need to have, and going to the source when we have issues or miscommunications. We’ve committed to being grateful for the opportunity that we have as educators and as change agents, and we are modeling this approach to life and learning for our kids and community.

 
It’s no surprise that this has been a truly amazing start to the school year, with this focus playing out palpably already in the hallways and classrooms, and the positive energy of our lower school humming at a fever pitch. Changing our own mindsets as adults has had a profound effect on how we come to school each day, and my challenge for all of us is to keep it up…and to turn this wonderful start into just “the way we do things around here”. If you haven’t read Achor’s book yet, then do yourself a favor and pick it up. It’s an easy read but a very powerful one, and a book that can truly help you leverage that happiness advantage.

 
Anyway, being a world class educator begins with who you are as a person for the people that you meet throughout the day, and what mindset you bring to school with you when you enter the building…so keep those smiles burning bright, cultivate that joy, and be grateful. Have a wonderful week everyone and remember to be great for our students and good to each other. 

Quote of the Week….Everywhere you go, take a smile with you – Sasha Azevedo

Inspiring Videos – 

Earning your Parent Stripes

Holding Doors

The Happiness Advantage for Children

Addicted Handyman

TED Talks – 

Shawn Achor

Malcolm Gladwell

Related Articles –

Why is Positive Psychology Important?

The Pursuit of Happiness

In the Classroom

Happy Teachers, Happy Students

Happy Classrooms

About Daniel Kerr

Dan Kerr is now Lower School Director at the American School of Paris. He previously served as Intermediate Division Principal at Academia Cotopaxi American International School in Quito, Ecuador, and prior to that was the Middle School Principal at SCIS in Shanghai, China. Dan has also worked at JIS in Jakarta, Indonesia and he began his International career in Abu Dhabi. Dan is thrilled to be joining the ASP family and will be accompanied by his wife, Jocelyn, who will be working as a counselor, and his two children, Max and Gabby. 
This entry was posted in Daniel Kerr. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *