Tag Archives: library

GLOBAL BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS

Why do we call it ‘nonfiction’? ‘Information Books’ might be a more direct label. These titles are all full of information. Information books help kids to learn and recognize facts about the world – whatever the topic may be. And you’re never too young (or old) to learn. I learned much from these newly released books.

Bear Has a Belly by Jane Wittingham uses gorgeous photos to show how animals and children are similar. Rabbits have ears, and so does a child. This beautifully executed board book will make children familiar with wildlife, with names of body parts and also create a deeper awareness of our connectedness with nature.

ISBN 978-1-77278-268-4, Pajama Press

Let’s Add Up by Victoria Allenby, with art by Maggie Zeng, is a frolicking romp counting to 10. Instruments, dishes, costumes and friends – all add up to band, feasts and parties. Fun to count and read (and then have a party!) with a Kindergarten class.

ISBN 978-1-77278-248-6, Pajama Press

If You Can Dream It, You Can Do It by Colleen Nelson and Kathie MacIsaac is an inspiring, in-depth look at how specific people came to their profession. What does it take to become a stunt person? Can you go to school to become a journalist? What do zookeepers exactly do and can you actually be a professional video game player? This book features 25 individuals with a wide variety of interesting jobs and what it takes to get there. Complete with variations and examples. A great resource for ‘career day’.

ISBN 978-1-77278-228-8, Pajama Press

One of my favourite new titles is African Icons by Tracey Baptiste. This fascinating chapter book looks a bit text-bookish but is a great read for all ages. Following ten important, but little known, people who shaped history, this book demonstrates how the history we were taught was focused on Europeans. These ten important figures hail from Africa and shaped, not only black history, but world history. Rather than focusing on slavery as black history, Baptiste takes us along for a journey long before that, to early history starting in the thirty-first century BCE in Egypt. Powerfully written, this book should be in every school as it lends more appreciation and balance to our understanding of how human history was shaped. I couldn’t put it down. 

ISBN 978-1-77306-870-1, Groundwood Books

A small but powerful book that will appeal to highschool students is The Prisoner and The Writer, by Heather Camlot. Using the dual story of Captain Dreyfuss of the France Army, in 1895, wrongfully accused as treason; and that of world renowned author Emile Zola, Camlot demonstrates the importance of speaking up to tell the truth. Relating the case of Dreyfuss being shipped to a remote island under false pretences, because he was Jewish, Camlot asks the reader, ‘how do you know what the truth is?’ She touches on the importance of checking sources and learning about all sides of a story. Zola risked everything to speak up for a stranger, once he knew the case was rigged. What would you do if you knew of an injustice? This story works on many different levels and can be an important tool in discussions with older students. The artwork by Sophie Casson adds to the power of the text.

ISBN 978-1-77306-632-5, Groundwood Books

And here’s a small but also powerful book for environmentalists of all ages. Severn Speaks Out is the speech that Severn Suzuki gave in 1992 at the Earth Summit. Her powerful words are even more important today because we need all the help we can get to change our ways and save our planet. Severn’s words can encourage others to take action and urge governments and corporations to change their ways. 

ISBN  978-1773068879 , Groundwood Books

Margriet Ruurs is a Canadian author of over 40 books for children. She conducts author visits to International Schools. Her newest book will be released this Fall and it called WHERE WE LIVE, Kids Can Press. www.margrietruurs.com